• Reader - Writer Problem : Classical Problems on Process Synchronization

    the readers-writers problems are examples of a common computing problem in concurrency. There are at least three variations of the problems, which deal with situations in which many threads try to access the same shared resource at one time. Some threads may read and some may write, with the constraint that no process may access the share for either reading or writing, while another process is in the act of writing to it. (In particular, it is allowed for two or more readers to access the share at the same time.) A readers-writer lock is a data structure that solves one or more of the readers-writers problems.

    published: 28 Mar 2016
  • Reader Writer Problem | Semaphores | Operating System | part - 14

    This video contains solution of producer consumer problem using semaphores which is used as a tool for normalization and will help you in various competitive exams like GATE , NET, PSU'S etc

    published: 01 Sep 2016
  • DINING PHILOSOPHER PROBLEM : Classical Problems of Process Synchronization

    Dining philosopher problem is one of classical process synchronization problem. This problem state that there are five philosopher who spent their life in thinking and eating. There are five forks available on the table. How forks can be assigned to philosopher so that there won't be any problem of Deadlock and starvation.

    published: 17 Mar 2016
  • 2 Hours To Write A Track #1 [24/04/2017]

    Writing music on Twitch every Monday and Wednesday at 6pm European Time. https://www.twitch.tv/the_alg0rithm

    published: 25 Apr 2017
  • Spring 2017 Research Grant Writing - Writers Algorithm

    5/16/2017

    published: 22 Jun 2017
  • How 'Hard Science Fiction Novels' get written | Tim Poston | TEDxNITKSurathkal

    Tim Poston tells about every detailing that goes into writing a science fiction. Every component in a fictional book is supported by existing scientific theories. He explains the geographical intricacies of a different planet which plays the backdrop in the story. He presents the fictional story in a factually believable manner by providing phenomenal explanation. Timothy "Tim" Poston (born 19 June 1945 in St Albans, Hertfordshire) is an English mathematician best known for his work on catastrophe theory. His 1972 Ph.D at the University of Warwick was directed by Christopher Zeeman on "Fuzzy Geometry". Tim specializes in geometry, graphics, algorithm design, human-computer interaction, medical imaging, patent writing and singularity theory.[4] His books on catastrophe theory and ...

    published: 30 Jan 2017
  • Readers & Writers Problem Algorithm - Operating System

    published: 22 May 2017
  • Book Launches, Common Amazon Algorithm Mistakes, and Writing a 12 Week Trilogy with Chris Fox

    Today we welcome back the prolific Chris Fox. We'll be discussing ways to accelerate one's writing process, the value of rapid book releases, and how best to navigate and utilize Amazon's Algorithms.

    published: 12 Apr 2017
  • Dining Philosopher problem (semaphore )

    This is a operating system deadlock problem. This video is about the dining philosopher deadlock problem and its solution using semaphores.

    published: 11 Nov 2013
  • Data Structures and Algorithms in the 21st Century

    Jacinta Catherine Richardson http://linux.conf.au/schedule/presentation/69/ Data structures and algorithms are essential tools in the developer's toolkit, yet it is an area that is too easy to get behind in. The essential algorithms you learned whenever you did Computer Science probably included: 1. Shortest path and tree (and graph) traversals - depth-first, breadth first, cycle management 2. Sorting - quick sort, bubble sort, merge sort, binary sort 3. Searching - binary trees, B-trees, B+trees, red-black trees 4. Specific problems - knapsack problem, painters algorithm, decision trees 5. Algorithm tecniques - divide and conquer, backtracking, creating NFAs You might also have learned the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and the Convolution theorem. For data structures you migh...

    published: 20 Jan 2017
  • Job Automation: Are Writers, Artists, and Musicians Replaceable?

    You're probably reading this from either a smartphone or a laptop. It's no small secret that the device you're looking at can create works of art... if you put your mind to it. But therein lies the point that Andrew McAfee makes in this video: you need to put your own creativity into the computer for it to work. Interestingly enough, computers are pretty adept at creating architecture and music. This is largely because what is pleasing to the quote-unquote "Western aesthetic mind" is easy to replicate. Music follows a formula, as does pleasing architecture and design. But when AI tries to replicate the human condition, or relate in any way to emotions and feelings, that is where even the smartest computer brains fails. Great news for all us writers out there. Not so great for all the graph...

    published: 10 Jul 2017
  • Sunspring | A Sci-Fi Short Film Starring Thomas Middleditch

    In the wake of Google's AI Go victory, filmmaker Oscar Sharp turned to his technologist collaborator Ross Goodwin to build a machine that could write screenplays. They created "Jetson" and fueled him with hundreds of sci-fi TV and movie scripts. Shortly thereafter, Jetson announced it wished to be addressed as Benjamin. Building a team including Thomas Middleditch, star of HBO's Silicon Valley, they gave themselves 48 hours to shoot and edit whatever Benjamin (Jetson) decided to write. Lyrics by Benjamin (formerly known as Jetson), an LSTM RNN Artificial Intelligence. Music Composed and Performed by Tiger + Man (https://soundcloud.com/tigerandman/home-on-the-land) http://www.tigerandman.com For more from the filmmakers visit: http://www.thereforefilms.com http://www.rossgoodwin.com htt...

    published: 09 Jun 2016
  • Why These Chords - Writing Music for Pop Songs

    The I, IV, V chord progression, tonic, dominant, subdominant relationship, chord substitutions and writing pop songs. Here's a link to the chart diagram: http://imgur.com/o90JyM2

    published: 28 Jan 2014
  • What Self-Published Authors Are *Really* Making with Data Guy from the Author Earnings Report

    We will be talking to Data Guy, keeper of the numbers behind the Author Earnings report, about what the stats can tell us about the state of self-publishing.

    published: 17 Feb 2016
  • Reader’s Writer Problem | Complete Solution with Semaphore

    Reader’s Writer Problem | Complete Solution with Semaphore Like Us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Easy-Engineering-Classes-346838485669475/ Operating System Hindi Classes Operating System Tutorial for Beginners in Hindi Operating System Study Notes Operating System Video Lectures

    published: 29 Jan 2017
  • Lecture 8. Unit 6. Multiple Writers algorithm

    Multiple Writers algorithm

    published: 03 Feb 2013
Reader - Writer Problem : Classical Problems on Process Synchronization

Reader - Writer Problem : Classical Problems on Process Synchronization

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:31
  • Updated: 28 Mar 2016
  • views: 19303
videos
the readers-writers problems are examples of a common computing problem in concurrency. There are at least three variations of the problems, which deal with situations in which many threads try to access the same shared resource at one time. Some threads may read and some may write, with the constraint that no process may access the share for either reading or writing, while another process is in the act of writing to it. (In particular, it is allowed for two or more readers to access the share at the same time.) A readers-writer lock is a data structure that solves one or more of the readers-writers problems.
https://wn.com/Reader_Writer_Problem_Classical_Problems_On_Process_Synchronization
Reader Writer Problem | Semaphores | Operating System | part - 14

Reader Writer Problem | Semaphores | Operating System | part - 14

  • Order:
  • Duration: 16:20
  • Updated: 01 Sep 2016
  • views: 50891
videos
This video contains solution of producer consumer problem using semaphores which is used as a tool for normalization and will help you in various competitive exams like GATE , NET, PSU'S etc
https://wn.com/Reader_Writer_Problem_|_Semaphores_|_Operating_System_|_Part_14
DINING PHILOSOPHER PROBLEM : Classical Problems of Process Synchronization

DINING PHILOSOPHER PROBLEM : Classical Problems of Process Synchronization

  • Order:
  • Duration: 17:02
  • Updated: 17 Mar 2016
  • views: 39339
videos
Dining philosopher problem is one of classical process synchronization problem. This problem state that there are five philosopher who spent their life in thinking and eating. There are five forks available on the table. How forks can be assigned to philosopher so that there won't be any problem of Deadlock and starvation.
https://wn.com/Dining_Philosopher_Problem_Classical_Problems_Of_Process_Synchronization
2 Hours To Write A Track #1 [24/04/2017]

2 Hours To Write A Track #1 [24/04/2017]

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:04:34
  • Updated: 25 Apr 2017
  • views: 2956
videos
Writing music on Twitch every Monday and Wednesday at 6pm European Time. https://www.twitch.tv/the_alg0rithm
https://wn.com/2_Hours_To_Write_A_Track_1_24_04_2017
Spring 2017 Research Grant Writing - Writers Algorithm

Spring 2017 Research Grant Writing - Writers Algorithm

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:26:07
  • Updated: 22 Jun 2017
  • views: 4
videos
5/16/2017
https://wn.com/Spring_2017_Research_Grant_Writing_Writers_Algorithm
How 'Hard Science Fiction Novels' get written | Tim Poston | TEDxNITKSurathkal

How 'Hard Science Fiction Novels' get written | Tim Poston | TEDxNITKSurathkal

  • Order:
  • Duration: 16:37
  • Updated: 30 Jan 2017
  • views: 317
videos
Tim Poston tells about every detailing that goes into writing a science fiction. Every component in a fictional book is supported by existing scientific theories. He explains the geographical intricacies of a different planet which plays the backdrop in the story. He presents the fictional story in a factually believable manner by providing phenomenal explanation. Timothy "Tim" Poston (born 19 June 1945 in St Albans, Hertfordshire) is an English mathematician best known for his work on catastrophe theory. His 1972 Ph.D at the University of Warwick was directed by Christopher Zeeman on "Fuzzy Geometry". Tim specializes in geometry, graphics, algorithm design, human-computer interaction, medical imaging, patent writing and singularity theory.[4] His books on catastrophe theory and on differential geometry and relativity are still in print after a third of a century. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
https://wn.com/How_'Hard_Science_Fiction_Novels'_Get_Written_|_Tim_Poston_|_Tedxnitksurathkal
Readers & Writers Problem Algorithm - Operating System

Readers & Writers Problem Algorithm - Operating System

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:48
  • Updated: 22 May 2017
  • views: 56
videos
https://wn.com/Readers_Writers_Problem_Algorithm_Operating_System
Book Launches, Common Amazon Algorithm Mistakes, and Writing a 12 Week Trilogy with Chris Fox

Book Launches, Common Amazon Algorithm Mistakes, and Writing a 12 Week Trilogy with Chris Fox

  • Order:
  • Duration: 47:46
  • Updated: 12 Apr 2017
  • views: 1357
videos
Today we welcome back the prolific Chris Fox. We'll be discussing ways to accelerate one's writing process, the value of rapid book releases, and how best to navigate and utilize Amazon's Algorithms.
https://wn.com/Book_Launches,_Common_Amazon_Algorithm_Mistakes,_And_Writing_A_12_Week_Trilogy_With_Chris_Fox
Dining Philosopher problem (semaphore )

Dining Philosopher problem (semaphore )

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:45
  • Updated: 11 Nov 2013
  • views: 57415
videos
This is a operating system deadlock problem. This video is about the dining philosopher deadlock problem and its solution using semaphores.
https://wn.com/Dining_Philosopher_Problem_(Semaphore_)
Data Structures and Algorithms in the 21st Century

Data Structures and Algorithms in the 21st Century

  • Order:
  • Duration: 41:01
  • Updated: 20 Jan 2017
  • views: 2054
videos
Jacinta Catherine Richardson http://linux.conf.au/schedule/presentation/69/ Data structures and algorithms are essential tools in the developer's toolkit, yet it is an area that is too easy to get behind in. The essential algorithms you learned whenever you did Computer Science probably included: 1. Shortest path and tree (and graph) traversals - depth-first, breadth first, cycle management 2. Sorting - quick sort, bubble sort, merge sort, binary sort 3. Searching - binary trees, B-trees, B+trees, red-black trees 4. Specific problems - knapsack problem, painters algorithm, decision trees 5. Algorithm tecniques - divide and conquer, backtracking, creating NFAs You might also have learned the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and the Convolution theorem. For data structures you might have learned: 1. Matrices 2. Linked lists 3. Hashing 4. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) from Linear Algebra This talk will overview some of the more interesting parts of the above (such as the FFT, convolution theorem, and SVD) before providing an overview of some of the more interesting algorithms developed in the last 16 years.
https://wn.com/Data_Structures_And_Algorithms_In_The_21St_Century
Job Automation: Are Writers, Artists, and Musicians Replaceable?

Job Automation: Are Writers, Artists, and Musicians Replaceable?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:23
  • Updated: 10 Jul 2017
  • views: 23685
videos
You're probably reading this from either a smartphone or a laptop. It's no small secret that the device you're looking at can create works of art... if you put your mind to it. But therein lies the point that Andrew McAfee makes in this video: you need to put your own creativity into the computer for it to work. Interestingly enough, computers are pretty adept at creating architecture and music. This is largely because what is pleasing to the quote-unquote "Western aesthetic mind" is easy to replicate. Music follows a formula, as does pleasing architecture and design. But when AI tries to replicate the human condition, or relate in any way to emotions and feelings, that is where even the smartest computer brains fails. Great news for all us writers out there. Not so great for all the graphic designers, though! Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/andrew-mcafee-theres-one-quality-that-makes-humans-creative-can-ai-learn-it Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Just about every time that I get involved in a discussion or a conversation about technological progress and how it can take away jobs from people and how it can automate away things that people used to do, one of the first things that people talk about this irreplaceable human skill is creativity, is coming up with some kind of eureka. And I think that is simultaneously correct and not correct at all. And let me talk first about the way that it's not correct at all. There are lots of different definitions of creativity out there. One of them that I walk around with is the ability to come up with a powerful or a useful legitimately novel idea. I think that's what creative people, whether they are innovators or entrepreneurs or investors or musicians or painters, a lot of what I think of as creativity is this eureka, this coming up with something that's valuable or valued and also pretty novel. Machines can do that now by any definition they can do that in lots of different domains. There's a rapidly growing field called generative design and what that means is if you feed into a modern piece of technology the specifications that you want this building to be able to handle or this heat exchanger or the frame of a car or some kind of part out there in the physical world that has to meet some performance specifications or fit inside some performance envelope we've got software that will generate a part that will do that admirably. And what's interesting is when you couple that software to a 3-D printer you print out these arbitrarily complex shapes that do exactly what you want them to do. They're typically very, very high performing, they're typically very efficient. They very often look different than what a human designer would come up with. When I look at the parts that get churned out by generative design software they look skulls or skeletons or exoskeletons that you see in nature and I was initially surprised by that. I don't think I should be surprised by that, the forms that nature produces are by definition really, really useful and really efficient because they've survived all the evolutionary challenges in history so far and arrived at this point so they're really beautiful objects. Generative design software can turn out objects like that now that remind me a lot of things that we see in the natural world. They look different than what human designers come up with. They perform better in many cases than what human designers come up with. I would call the work of design a very creative endeavor. We have technology that's now good at that. There's also technology that can compose music in almost any style that you suggest. And there's an interesting phenomenon going on there: when people know in advance that they're going to be listening to computer generated music they very often dismiss it as shallow or trivial or obviously not coming from a human composer's mind and heart. When listeners don't know in advance that they're listening to computer generated music they very often find it as evocative, as beautiful, as moving as anything a human being would come up with. I guess we shouldn't be so surprised by that. Human taste in music is not this great unknown. We know some of the rules about what western listeners, for example, find appealing in music. You can bake those rules into software, hit go and generate a lot of music. So again, that's an endeavor where I would've thought of it as creative and computers are clearly doing at least an adequate job, possibly a really, really good job. However, what we haven't seen yet are computers that can turn out lyrics on top of that music that sound anything except either really, really silly or flat out nonsensical and ridiculous.
https://wn.com/Job_Automation_Are_Writers,_Artists,_And_Musicians_Replaceable
Sunspring | A Sci-Fi Short Film Starring Thomas Middleditch

Sunspring | A Sci-Fi Short Film Starring Thomas Middleditch

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:03
  • Updated: 09 Jun 2016
  • views: 877671
videos
In the wake of Google's AI Go victory, filmmaker Oscar Sharp turned to his technologist collaborator Ross Goodwin to build a machine that could write screenplays. They created "Jetson" and fueled him with hundreds of sci-fi TV and movie scripts. Shortly thereafter, Jetson announced it wished to be addressed as Benjamin. Building a team including Thomas Middleditch, star of HBO's Silicon Valley, they gave themselves 48 hours to shoot and edit whatever Benjamin (Jetson) decided to write. Lyrics by Benjamin (formerly known as Jetson), an LSTM RNN Artificial Intelligence. Music Composed and Performed by Tiger + Man (https://soundcloud.com/tigerandman/home-on-the-land) http://www.tigerandman.com For more from the filmmakers visit: http://www.thereforefilms.com http://www.rossgoodwin.com http://www.Benjamin.wtf Connect with Ars Technica Magazine Online: Visit ArsTechnica.com: http://arstechnica.com Follow Ars Technica on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/arstechnica Follow Ars Technica on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+ArsTechnica/videos Follow Ars Technica on Twitter: https://twitter.com/arstechnica Sunspring | A Sci-Fi Short Film Starring Thomas Middleditch Starring: Thomas Middleditch Director: Oscar Sharp Executive Producer: Walter Kortschak Producer: Allison Friedman, Andrew Kortschak, and Andrew Swett Writer: Benjamin (formerly known as Jetson), an LSTM RNN Artificial Intelligence Writer of Writer: Ross Goodwin an End Cue Production
https://wn.com/Sunspring_|_A_Sci_Fi_Short_Film_Starring_Thomas_Middleditch
Why These Chords - Writing Music for Pop Songs

Why These Chords - Writing Music for Pop Songs

  • Order:
  • Duration: 17:47
  • Updated: 28 Jan 2014
  • views: 253946
videos
The I, IV, V chord progression, tonic, dominant, subdominant relationship, chord substitutions and writing pop songs. Here's a link to the chart diagram: http://imgur.com/o90JyM2
https://wn.com/Why_These_Chords_Writing_Music_For_Pop_Songs
What Self-Published Authors Are *Really* Making with Data Guy from the Author Earnings Report

What Self-Published Authors Are *Really* Making with Data Guy from the Author Earnings Report

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:11:21
  • Updated: 17 Feb 2016
  • views: 3240
videos
We will be talking to Data Guy, keeper of the numbers behind the Author Earnings report, about what the stats can tell us about the state of self-publishing.
https://wn.com/What_Self_Published_Authors_Are_Really_Making_With_Data_Guy_From_The_Author_Earnings_Report
Reader’s Writer Problem | Complete Solution with Semaphore

Reader’s Writer Problem | Complete Solution with Semaphore

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:31
  • Updated: 29 Jan 2017
  • views: 9487
videos
Reader’s Writer Problem | Complete Solution with Semaphore Like Us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Easy-Engineering-Classes-346838485669475/ Operating System Hindi Classes Operating System Tutorial for Beginners in Hindi Operating System Study Notes Operating System Video Lectures
https://wn.com/Reader’S_Writer_Problem_|_Complete_Solution_With_Semaphore
Lecture 8. Unit 6. Multiple Writers algorithm

Lecture 8. Unit 6. Multiple Writers algorithm

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:01
  • Updated: 03 Feb 2013
  • views: 767
videos
Multiple Writers algorithm
https://wn.com/Lecture_8._Unit_6._Multiple_Writers_Algorithm
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